Preserving the past with a projection towards the future

1873 yr. old farmhouse, Loveland, Co.

The Milner- Schwarz House – 1873 yr. old farmhouse, Loveland, Co.

 

It is impossible to imagine what life was like well over a hundred years ago when we did not live in that time. This small 1873 yr. old farm-house was the first built, in this town and housed a family of farmers who made their living by what they grew. This historic home was nearly washed away in our 2013 flood here like so much else. But, fortunately it survived and is once again in the hands and care of people restoring it to its original state to be open for tours with newly added features like a miniature railroad, train like the big one that passes through town on tracks behind it, and community gardens typical of those grown with produce sold at the farmers market. It will also house antiques on display that tell their own story and history.

In preserving what once was we are reminded of things important to our community back then when farming and the sugar beet industry were paramount to living on what the land could return back in produce. Today as a thriving, growing city with its many museums and fine arts galleries hosting sculpture shows and companies with a long history like Hewlett-Packard and Woodward it continues to thrive, grow and prosper with the times. Still, the nurturing of the land with its community gardens, nearby farms, and the restoration of old homes, churches and structures like the feed and grain building that processed local crops grown, the sugar mill, the Burlington Northern railroad and depot, the old Loveland House Hotel, the Elks Lodge and others gives us a window to its past, with a hopeful glance towards its future even though we haven’t yet arrived there. We have only the present. And sometimes, even that is too unsettling or precarious to hold on to in today’s world with so many catastrophic events of nature that can so quickly, easily wipe out homes, towns or communities. So, we savor this moment in time and are thankful for what we have now.

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Joyce E. Johnson © 2015

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