A refuge and place called ‘home’ to the abused and neglected

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A male African lion. After taking several pictures of him from a distance we were finally rewarded with this close up shot of him walking up to the viewing platform.

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This mature grizzly kept his eyes on us the whole time we stood watching him from the walk out.

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This black bear loved his wooden post. He hugged it, rolled it, played with it, and even used it to scratch his back. All of the larger animals have big fresh water tanks, cool, comfortable ‘dens’ made with huge concrete culverts set into the ground so the bears can hibernate, or just get out of the hot sun to cool down. There are tire swings that hang from poles too, for them to play with.

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A grey wolf, common to the northern territories of Canada and the U.S. The ‘greys’ were in a separate enclosure from the Artic wolves, as seen below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Artic wolf. We wondered if this one was the ‘Alpha.’ He seemed more dominate over the pack as we watched their behavior and movements.

 

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This big grizzly was more intent on cleaning his paw. He paid no attention to his visitors.

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Now to just get the other leg in, and he’s ready for a swim in the water tank on a hot day.

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These two grizzlies find time for play, and a rough and tumble roll on the ground.

 

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Afternoon nap. There were several in this group of lions that were sleeping, all piled up, one on top of another with legs spread out in every direction. The lions and bears are more lethargic in the earlier part of the day when hot, but get more active later in the afternoon towards feeding time.

 

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My grandkids, Trevor and Alyssa at an entrance sign, “petting the tiger”.

 

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So long, from  all of us at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, CO.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of the animals above, and many more from other species are all rescued animals coming from abusive, neglected or abandonment situations. They are housed and kept in this beautiful 800+ acre compound preserve in Keenesburg, CO. They are fed on a regular rotating schedule, live in a protected environment, and get the best possible care with regular visits by a veterinarian. Many were rescued from circuses; abused, abandoned or neglected. Others were rescued from people who got the animals as pets when very young and could not properly care for them, so gave them up. There are ostriches, lynx, mountain lions, and even camels on the site. This was our second trip out to the preserve. It is an awesome place to visit the animals in a more natural setting with all the comforts of ‘home.’ To view pictures of them and others there, read their stories, donate to their care, or learn more about them, you can find it here.

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Joyce E. Johnson (2016)

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