Archive for June 2016

Sunset on Trail Ridge Road, RMNP

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Trail Ridge Road – Rocky Mountain National Park (June 2016)

The drive up Trail Ridge Road in RMNP is paved clear to the summit. The meandering, steep climb winds through forested thick stands of Ponderosa, Lodge Pole pine, Douglas fir, Juniper, and Spruce. Snowfalls, blizzards and drifts can make the drive treacherous any month of the year when a storm front moves in. I have been up on Trail Ridge Road in July in the middle of an unexpected snowstorm and blizzard that was not forecasted. The gates positioned at halfway and three-quarters way up are then closed to all traffic, except for snow plows.

About three thirds of the way up is the last major overlook with a paved path leading out away from the road about a quarter-mile to a viewing platform of loose rock, boulders, and tundra. The tree line is below the ridge here and one can look down and over to peaks stretching for miles beyond, into the horizon. The Alpine  Visitors’ Center is located at the top of Trail Ridge Road at an elevation of 12,000+ feet. Longs Peak at 14,000+ ft. sits in the middle of the mountain range, viewable from this vantage point.

We parked, walked the path out to the viewing platform and waited for the sun to make its slow descent over the peaks. It was dusk and the chipmunks and marmots played and scampered about on the rocks and tundra beyond the overlook viewing platform. It was another hour before we could get these pictures at about 8:30 to 8:45 p.m. During that time we watched the clouds dissipate, form again, change and move. It is an amazing sight to see the way the clouds change in the process with colder misty ones forming below the viewing point. We took a number of pictures during our wait. These are only a few of our favorites.

For more information on Trail Ridge Road and Rocky Mountain National Park, you can find it here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trail_Ridge_Road

Joyce E. Johnson (2016)

The Father’s Way

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When we were walking the trail one day with our dog I spotted these little geese families. We watched them first trot along in the high grass, across our path to the lake with all the babies’ in tow, their little heads barely seen above the grass. and then they quickly hurried over to the water and jumped in. Between the larger geese, leading and bringing up the rear the babies swam between. By the middle of spring there is a lot of new life and babies born to birds and game of all kinds. It was a touching sight to watch them, and I was so glad I had my camera. There were also little duck families that we saw on another day when I did not have my camera, so I have begun to take it along more regularly now when we walk so I don’t miss shots like this. As you can see, I have used the same photo for my blog header image as well.

While watching the geese and ducks I thought about the way parents of any species will fiercely protect and watch over their young, lead, and direct them through their young life, so they know how to be watchful of prey, to protect themselves when grown.

It is also the way our heavenly father watches over us with a much greater sense of protectiveness and direction, hoping that we will follow after Him, his leading, and know how to live in a way that assures us a safe, trusting pathway in life.  In Proverbs 13:1 of the Old Testament bible, it says, “A wise son heeds his father’s instruction.” Male or female, we all need that kind of leading which gives us the tools and instruction to live our lives in safety and harmony with others.

I was very fortunate to have an earthly father who led by example and taught us how to apply those biblical principles to our own life. But, it is my heavenly father who gives me eternal life, and the best of everything I can ever hope for, or expect. It is the Father’s way.

If you are a father, I wish you a Happy Father’s day, and the blessings and peace that only the Heavenly Father can give.

____________________

Joyce E. Johnson (2016)

Rocky Mountain’s High

A view of Long's Peak in the Rocky Mountains from Estes Park, Colorado

A view of Long’s Peak in the Rocky Mountains from Estes Park, Colorado, Photo credit; Joyce E. Johnson

ROCKY MOUNTAIN’S HIGH

Majestic, symbolic, touching near and far

in splendor each peak with

towering summits each speak

Of solid mass and might

commanding attention, they affect

park visitors that journey,

traveling through their portals high.

They stop to capture all its glory

focused through camera lens,

their eyes now scoping a huge black raptor,

his loud call proclaiming ownership to its prey.

It soars through void and space

shattering the solitude with ascent,

honoring the skies with its grace.

A climber grasps to reach

a pinnacle to the high

struggling through their efforts

with gasping and with sigh.

Then perched atop

what stretches far and wide

gazing over to the sights

of the Continental Divide.

Lodge Pole Pines grow thick beside

a mass of Douglass Fir and Spruce,

trees that cover the mountain’s side

stops where the tundra’s

soft moss bed lies,

rich with colors, green and blue.

Cold winds blow, the air is chilled

Aspen leaves turn a golden hue.

dropping quickly to the ground.

Layers of snow and ice soon cling

to the mountain slopes’ thick white fields.

Layers that repeat through winter months

with each snowfall, the skiers come,

leaving their tracks upon the slopes

until it warms and the sun melts all,

and the runoff begins, and the rivers flow.

All who come seeking their own experience here

will take away their memories of these

awe-inspiring peaks.

___________________

Joyce E. Johnson © 2016

 


Beseeching Visitor

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This is a wild Red Fox that hangs around our mountain property.

Encroaching our space

it came, light-footed, and quiet

with a molting, shaggy coat and tail,

a length of bushy, brown coarse fur

it stood uncertain on thin gangly legs.

It had a small heart-shaped face

with ears alert, as if pointed towards the sky,

and expression as if in earnest expectation

of what it hoped to find or gain.

But strangers we are not upon this land,

and intrigued to find him beseeching

at our mountain meadow in the sun.

_____________________

Joyce E. Johnson (2016)


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