Archive for the ‘Planting’ Category

Profusion in pink

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Profusion in pink,

and trees, their limbs full and green 

shelter birds that sing.

 ~~~

The sun is shining.

May comes, and with it new life,

expectancy, hope.

~~~

Is it the season,

or the newness of things fresh?

Spring; I savor all. 

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Joyce E. Johnson © 2016

Welcome April

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After all the snow

The sun shines; it’s warming up

And that is no joke 🙂

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Joyce E. Johnson © 2016 

April rains and spring flowers (Day 15 of NaPoWriMo, National Poetry Writing Month)


April brings showers

The fresh scent of falling rain

And new spring flowers

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Joyce E. Johnson (2014)

Summer wheat

Summer wheat

Summer wheat

A field in bright gold

Growing tall and wild like weeds

Is warmed by the sun

***

Billowing grain stalks

Sway, like a whispered soft breeze

Skims through a meadow

***

Along the river

The earth, damp from recent rains

Nurtures summer wheat

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Joyce E. Johnson (2013)

Summer Roses


The scent of roses

Lingers like a strong perfume

In the summer sun

Joyce E. Johnson (2013)

Cactus blooms in the Rockies

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When I and my family were up at our Glacier View mountain property over Memorial Day weekend I brought my cameras up, as they pretty much go everywhere with me now, especially up there to our lot. With all the moisture and late snow storms we’ve had the last two to three months the foothills were the greenest I have seen them in years. When we got to our lot, above 9,000 ft. elevation even the wildflowers were already in bloom. One of the types of blooming plants we have up there is this kind of mountain cactus that thrives through all kinds of weather. This one bloom and others like it are at their best right now, with the colorful pretty shades of pink, lavender and yellow. Many years ago I dug up one of our large cactus plants with beautiful yellow blooms on it and transported it back home to Loveland in a bucket with its own soil, then transplanted it with the same soil and mixed in some fresh potting soil. Because these cactus plants have very sharp needles and are too prickly to handle with bare hands I put on leather work gloves to work them carefully down into the soil and large clay pot. The cactus thrived and lived for years, blooming every late spring with beautiful yellow blooms. I took pictures of it in full bloom, but have misplaced that photo and did not have it handy to scan and upload it to this post, so am using this photo to show one of the cactus types that grow in our Colorado Rockies. We have many other wildflower plants too that grow up there and are in full bloom by July. Last year when our mountains suffered so terribly with uncontrolled wildfires that burnt thousands of acres our lot came close to burning too in the High Park fire in June, 2012, but it was spared. That was definitely an answered prayer and when we were able to get back up there again three weeks after the fire was contained I spotted some of our faithful, hearty little wildflowers blooming among the dried, scorched pine needles like these Daisy type blooms. It is sometimes the little things we often overlook because they are/were always there, but in the midst of all the burned areas, a single flower or cactus plant thrives through all, and green shoots come back to remind me to never take any of it for granted.

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Joyce E. Johnson

Making mud pies


From mud pies to gardening I still love to play in the dirt. There are lots of ways to enjoy nature and the great outdoors. Sixty years ago when I was six my mom would give me her old canning jar lids, spoons and bowls to play with in the dirt out beside our house. And of course there was my little ‘oven’ to bake them in: a cardboard box. My ‘cooking and baking’ process was simple. I started with the ‘freshest ingredients’ I could find; what I called ‘clean dirt’ and pulled out the unwanted things like weeds, little bugs or rocks, if any so my pies would be smooth and edible (for me that is). Once I had mixed just the right amount of water with the right amount of dirt I tasted my mixture to test its consistency, then if satisfied I patted them down into the lids and baked them in a hot, slow sun. When dry, I emptied my lids of the coarse over baked pie and would start all over again. When I told my grown girls that I ate some of my own mud pies when I was a child, they could not believe the story from one who hates insects and runs after the bug spray can at the first sight of an ant invasion. Now, when I play with my little grandchildren in the dirt planting a garden or potting flowers I can share my mud pie stories with them and let them know that a little bit of dirt does not hurt, and that mud is a part of nature, one of those things God gave us in this great big outdoors to enjoy. So, for old times sake I went outside and once again made an old-fashioned mud pie in a canning jar lid just for the fun of it, and it brought back memories of those days when I was six. So, here is a photo of my mud pie, and for certain I will show a picture of it to my grandchildren and let them know that making mud pies can be a lot of fun, and tasting them, not so bad, either. 🙂 But, I really did do quite a bit of real gardening this week too. The below photo is one of my potting projects. It was fun playing in that big barrel of dirt, too. 🙂

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Joyce E. Johnson


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